Month: May 2020

Stomatocytes

Stomatocytes

May 21st – Stomatocytes are erythrocytes with a slit-like central pallor, giving them the appearance of “coffee beans” or “kissing lips.” In three dimensions, the stomatocyte is actually the shape of a bowl, as the cell has lost its biconcave morphology due to a membrane defect. Most cases of stomatocytosis are due to alteration in …

Stomatocytes Read More »

Elliptocytes

Elliptocytes

May 20th – Elliptocytes, also known as ovalocytes, are abnormally shaped red blood cells that appear oval or elongated, from slightly egg-shaped to rod or pencil forms. They have normal central pallor with the hemoglobin appearing concentrated at the ends of the elongated cells when viewed through a light microscope. The ends of the cells …

Elliptocytes Read More »

Dacrocyte

Dacrocyte

May 19th – A dacrocyte (or dacryocyte) is a type of poikilocyte that is shaped like a teardrop (a “teardrop cell”). A marked increase of dacrocytes is known as “dacrocytosis”. These tear drop cells are found also in beta thalassemia major, especially after splenectomy. Dacrocytosis can be associated with myelophthisic anemia, commonly caused by myelofibrosis. …

Dacrocyte Read More »

Spherocytosis

Spherocytosis

May 18th – Spherocytosis is an auto-hemolytic anemia (a disease of the blood) characterized by the production of spherocytes (red blood cells) or erythrocytes that are sphere-shaped rather than bi-concave disk shaped. Spherocytes are found in all hemolytic anemias to some degree. Hereditary spherocytosis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia are characterized by having only spherocytes. Spherocytosis …

Spherocytosis Read More »

Codocytes

Codocytes

May 17th – Codocytes also known as target cells are red blood cells that have the appearance of a shooting target with a bullseye. In optical microscopy these cells appear to have a dark center (a central, hemoglobinized area) surrounded by a white ring (an area of relative pallor), followed by dark outer (peripheral) second …

Codocytes Read More »

Macrocytosis

Macrocytosis

May 16th – Macrocytosis is a term used to describe erythrocytes that are larger than normal, typically reported as mean cell volume (MCV) greater than 100 fL. The amount of hemoglobin increases proportionately with the increase in cell size. Therefore, if the increase in MCV is not related to macrocytic anemia, the mean cell hemoglobin …

Macrocytosis Read More »

Microcytosis

Microcytosis

May 15th – Many people are unaware that red blood cells have different morphological appearances based on the way the patient presents. The next week will explore these findings and their potential causes. Today we will explore Microcytosis, which is typically an incidental finding in asymptomatic patients who received a complete blood count for other …

Microcytosis Read More »

Cryptosporidium

Cryptosporidium

May 14th – Cryptosporidium infection begins when the one-celled cryptosporidium parasites get into your body through your mouth. Both the parasite and the disease are commonly known as “Crypto.” Some strains of cryptosporidium can cause more serious disease. The parasite is protected by an outer shell that allows it to survive outside the body for long periods …

Cryptosporidium Read More »

Corynebacterium Diphtheriae

Corynebacterium Diphtheriae

May 13th – Diphtheria is caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae.  Corynebacterium diphtheriae is a Gram-positive, aerobic, nonmotile, toxin-producing, rod-shaped bacteria belonging to the order Actinomycetales, which are typically found in soil, but also have pathogenic members such as streptomyces and mycobacteria. C. diphtheriae is best known for causing the disease Diphtheria in human beings, which results …

Corynebacterium Diphtheriae Read More »